SharePoint Fest – DC Wrap-up & Slides

My wife and I really enjoyed our visit to Washington DC last week.  The conference attendees were great and both my sessions and workshop were well attended.  It was a pleasure to feel that I was sharing information that people really wanted to learn about.  The week was even better because at night we got to spend time with my daughter, son-in-law, and 6 month old granddaughter.  Getting to present at a conference and spend time with family and friends is a great combination.

I promised to make my slides available, so I’ve uploaded them here.  They are also available on the SharePoint Fest DC site for attendees.  If you have any follow-up questions please email me at pstork@dontpapanic.com.  You can download a copy of the slides from each talk using the links below:

WS 203 – Office 365 Feature Explosion: What should you be using

ADM 105 – Protecting your Content: Demystifying Data Loss Prevention (DLP) in SharePoint

BV 204 – Implementing SharePoint: Failure to Plan is Planning to Fail

SPT 202 – Ensuring Business Continuity: Planning for High Availability and Disaster Recovery in SharePoint



Changing Default Permissions in Office 365 Group Sites

CloudLockChanging the permissions assigned to the default Owners, Members, and Visitors groups in a SharePoint site is easy.  You just navigate to Site Settings > Site Permissions.  Then select the group whose permissions you want to change and assign them a new permission level using the Edit User Permissions button in the Ribbon.  But that won’t work in the Site created behind an Office 365 Group.  When you try to use the same procedure you find that the Edit User Permissions button is greyed out if you select any of the built in administrative groups.  (See the Screenshot below.

EditGroupPermissions

The problem is that Office groups are created when you create a Security Group in Office 365. By default that security group is added to the built-in Members group of the Site Collection.  To make sure that you don’t inadvertently lock users out of the site Microsoft disables your ability to change the permission on the default Administrative groups when using an Office Group based site. 

But there is still a way to modify the permissions for the users in the groups.  If you navigate to the home page of the site and select Site Permissions from the Settings menu (the gear) you will see a panel open on the right hand side of the browser window.  Under Site Members you will see the security group that provides the basis for the Office group you created. If you select Edit under that group you can change the permissions for the members of the group to either Read or Full Control. However, instead of changing the permission level for the group it will actually move the security group to either the Site Visitors or Site Owners groups respectively.

O365Change Group permissions

But what if I want to change the default group’s permissions to Contribute instead of Edit? To do that you’ll need to use two different SharePoint groups. 

  • First, use the Site permissions panel to move the underlying security group from the Site Members group to the Site Visitors group.  This will give all your users Read permissions to the site.
  • Second, click on the Advanced permissions settings link at the bottom of the panel.  This will take you to the regular site permissions page that you are used to.  Now you can create a new SharePoint group and assign it whatever permission level you want.  After you create the group add the same security group you moved above as a member of the new SharePoint group.  Since SharePoint permissions are additive this will give all your users both Read permission and whatever new permission level you assigned, for example Contribute.

I hope that clarifies how to manage Permissions in the new Office 365 group sites.  Since Team sites are based on Office Groups, the same procedure applies to any Team sites you’ve created.

SharePoint Saturday – Cincinnati

SPSCincinnatiI had a small but enthusiastic group at my session this past Saturday at the SharePoint Saturday Cincinnati event. We had an excellent discussion about the planning that organizations should do before they implement or upgrade a SharePoint environment.  I promised attendees that I would post my slides by today before I got busy with other things.  You can find a link to the session below…

Implementing SharePoint: Failure to Plan is Planning to Fail (Slides)

One of the most common mistakes I’ve seen clients make when implementing SharePoint is to not spend enough time review a list of seven planning topics that are critical to the success of every SharePoint project. We’ll review what questions you should ask and why each area is critical to project.
The seven areas include:
• Governance
• Security
• Content Classification (Taxonomy/Folksonomy)
• Physical and Logical Architecture
• High Availability/Disaster Recovery
• Staffing
• Training/Communications

Dogfood 2017 Conference Slides

Dogfood2015_thumbI really enjoyed my time at the Dogfood Conference in Columbus on Friday. The attendees were great and my talk on OneDrive Sync was well attended. There were lots of questions, but I was still able to power through my slides and the demos.  I want to express my thanks to the conference organizers and the attendees for the wonderful conference. I really enjoyed myself and I hope to be invited back to speak again next year.

I promised attendees that I would post the slides, so I’ve uploaded them here.  If you didn’t get a chance to respond to the survey I posted you can also find a link to that here:

Slides – Intro To OneDrive Next Gen Sync: What is it, how does it work, and can I manage it?

Short Survey https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ZZPWVN6


OneDrive Sync Now Supports ONLY NTFS

OneDriveNextGenSyncAn update to the OneDrive Next Gen Sync client that rolled out beginning in early January has limited where you can place the sync folder for your OneDrive files.  The target is now required to be a New Technology File System (NTFS) formatted drive.  When commenting on this Microsoft says that non-NTFS drives have never been supported, but that the client didn’t check in the past.  The change, according to Microsoft, is just tightening up the error checking in the OneDrive client and not implementation of a new feature.  According to Microsoft that’s why the change was released with no notice. It should be noted that OneDrive system requirements don’t list the NTFS limitation.  Resilient File System (REFS), Microsoft’s newest formatting, is also not supported.  User’s should plan to update the format of their drives to NTFS if they plan to use the OneDrive Next Gen Sync client.